Life Matters Media
Quality of life at the end of life

Palliative Medical Teams Encouraged By Institute Of Medicine’s “Dying In America” Report

Courtesy the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Courtesy the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Palliative medicine for the seriously ill should be covered by all payers and provided by all health organizations, said Dr. Diane Meier, director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care, during a presentation exploring new findings about dying in America.

Meier addressed a widely circulated report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) calling for new public engagement strategies to foster informed decision-making. According to Dying in America, not only do most Americans lack basic understanding about end of life care choices, but community leaders “have not fully utilized strategies to make that knowledge available, meaningful and relevant across diverse population groups.”

Meier, a member of the IOM, helped develop the institute’s five key reccomendations: more person-centered, family-oriented palliative care; better doctor-patient communication and advance care planning; professional education and development; better policies and payment systems; and more public education and engagement.

The report cited the present as the best time to help normalize conversations about death and dying, partly because millions of aging baby boomers will require such conversations in the near-future. It also pointed to the social trends of health consumers’ willingness to pursue high-quality care, a growing urge to share stories about end of life care experience that resonate across diverse populations and engaged leadership within local communities.

“When the IOM says that something should be done, there is enormous imprimatur, legitimacy and influence on the zeitgeist about what’s acceptable to talk about,” Meier said. The IOM acts under the National Academy of Sciences through its congressional charter as advisor to the federal government. It is nonpartisan and funded by a network of donors, endowments and contracts.

Meier acknowledged the difficult nature of changing federal policies and payment systems involving end of life care, partly because of political polarization surrounding the Affordable Care Act– the health reform law signed by President Obama in 2010 and recently upheld by the Supreme Court.

Thirty percent of likely voters when polled said the law allows government “death panels” to make decisions about patients’ end of life care, a theory discredited by most medical professionals.

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“We have a real challenge to improving accurate information and understanding on the part of the public about what palliative care is about and what it’s not,” she added. Palliative medicine is usually provided only to the terminally ill to help treat symptoms and side-effects of disease and aggressive treatments. The goal is not cure.

Meier mentioned a handful of national campaigns helping familiarize Americans with the benefits of comfort care and advance care planning, including a major effort from the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network.

“We are working with disease-specific organizations. When a patient googles lung cancer, two things come up: the Wikipedia page and the American Cancer Society or other disease-specific organization,” Meier offered. “Through our partnership, we have developed a series of ads talking about palliative care that sees the patient beyond cancer treatments.”

Part of the cancer network’s “Quality of Life” campaign includes advertisements in magazines. One depicts a female cancer patient looking upward with the word “chemotherapy” written below. The “che” and “apy” are crossed out in purple, highlighting the word “mother.”